Blog > Archive for the ‘Teaching American History Grants’ Category
No Funding for FY 2011 Teaching American History Grant Applications

The Department of Education has decided not to fund any of Teaching American History (TAH) grant applications submitted in 2011. Instead, remaining funds will be used for continuation grants for some current TAH projects. An email was sent out last week:


Sent: Fri 5/27/2011 1:18 PM
Subject: 2011 Application For Grants Under the Teaching American History Program

Dear Sir or Madam:

Thank you for your application to the Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 Teaching American History (TAH) grant completion.   As you may be aware, funding for many Department of Education programs was decreased in the FY 2011 full-year continuing resolution.  As a result, there are sufficient funds only to support continuation grants for the TAH program to current grantees.  We, therefore, will not be making any new awards in FY 2011 for this program.

We appreciate your interest in this program and your support for improving the teaching of American history in our nation’s schools. We encourage you to access the TAH Web site, which lists all current grantees and provides abstracts for their projects.  These projects include a variety of strategies with activities that support high-quality professional development for history teachers.  That site may be accessed at http://teachinghistory.org/tah-grants.

If you have further questions on the TAH program, please do not hesitate to contact me.


Peggi Zelinko
Director
Teacher Quality Programs
Office of Innovation and Improvement
U.S. Department of Education

Meanwhile, the House of Representatives has a taken another step towards eliminating the TAH program.

Read some of our previous posts on evaluation and the Teaching American History program:

The evaluation of the TAH program, George Washington, and lessons learned:

Teaching American History Grant Evaluation: Glenn Beck, the Center for American Progress and “No Evidence”? -Part III

TAH, evaluation, evidence, and how a Fox News analyst’s remarks criticizing the Teaching American History program were misleading at best:

Teaching American History Grant Evaluation: Glenn Beck, the Center for American Progress and “No Evidence”? -Part II

How Glenn Beck and the Center for American Progress have sparred over the Teaching American History program:

Teaching American History Grant Evaluation: Glenn Beck, the Center for American Progress and “No Evidence”? -Part I

Education Budget Details: Race to the Top and Teaching American History
Here is a pdf from the House Appropriations Committee of all the 2011 budget cuts.  Education Week’s Politics K-12 blog highlights:
It eliminates a number of education programs, including:

  • Educational Technology State Grants—$100 million.
  • Literacy Through School Libraries—$19 million.
  • Byrd Honors Scholarship Program—$42 million.

And it includes cuts to other education programs. For instance:

  • School Improvement Grants would be funded at $536 million, a $10 million cut.
  • Teaching American History would be cut by $73 million. The program is now financed at $119 million, so that’s pretty significant.
  • The GEARUP and TRIO college access programs also would be cut. GEARUP, which got $323 million in fiscal year 2010, would lose $20 million. And TRIO, which got $910 million last year, would lose $25 million.
More on Teaching American History from the National Coalition for History:
The Teaching American History Grants program sustained a cut of $73 million (-61%) down from $119 million in FY ’10 to $46 million. While this is disheartening, throughout the budget process House Republicans had repeatedly targeted the program for elimination. The Administration as well had zeroed out TAH for FY ’11 and proposed consolidating history education in a new Well Rounded Education program where it would have competed for funding with arts, music, foreign languages, civics, economics and other subjects.

So the fact that TAH survived at all is a major victory. Had the TAH program been eliminated it would have been nearly impossible to resuscitate it in the upcoming FY ’12 budget process and down the road in the pending reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA).

One question is whether the $46 million will be enough to fund new FY ’11 TAH grants. At a public forum earlier this year, Department of Education staff stated continuing grants would have priority in receiving FY ‘11 funding and any remaining funds would go to new grants.

In FY ‘08, the Education Department awarded three year TAH grants, but provided the option for the grantees to apply for additional funds for a fourth or fifth year. The FY ’08 grantees have been required to file detailed progress reports with the department and they are being evaluated to determine whether they merit additional funding.

The application deadline was April 4. However, there is no way of knowing yet how many FY ‘08 grantees applied for additional out-year funding and if they will qualify. As a result, given the limited amount of funds available, conceivably there could be no new TAH grants made this year.

Education Week’s Curriculum Matters blog says:
As for Teaching American History grants, which are extremely popular with many history educators—and are widely seen as helping them better understand the past and giving them new tools to teach about it—the funding would be reduced by $73 million. That said, given the current fiscal climate, the fact that the program apparently will remain intact is good news for its fans. If the money had been wiped away altogether, it might have been far more difficult, politically, to restart the history-grants program in future years.

Andrew Mink, the director of outreach and education at the University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education, told me this morning that there was a big push by educators, historians, and others to protect the Teaching American History grants program. (Mink has been involved with several grants in Virginia under the program.) And while he said it’s disappointing to see the big cut, he’s relieved that the program will continue.

“Once funding is [abolished], you can’t regenerate it,” he said. “Keeping some blood in it was absolutely a victory.”

See John Fea’s post as well on TAH.  Also from Education Week on RTT 2.0:
Race to the Top was a winner, getting $700 million for a one-year extension of the economic-stimulus program, which was to expire.

The bill isn’t clear on just how much of the money would go to new state grants and how much would go to early-learning grants. That means it would be up to the Education Department. From my reading of the bill, it sounds like the department could also combine the competitions if it so chose.

Under the original language that created Race to the Top, states were required to give half of their award to districts. But the bill would allow the department to waive that requirement for the new early-learning grants.

And before you get all excited about a new state K-12 competition, it’s also important to note that under the bill, the department could just pick new winners from among the states that had applied for the second round of Race to the Top, but lost out.
Teaching American History Grant Evaluation: Glenn Beck, the Center for American Progress and “No Evidence”? -Part III
In earlier posts we discussed:

1) How Glenn Beck and the Center for American Progress have sparred over the Teaching American History program.

2) How a Fox News analyst’s remarks criticizing the Teaching American History program were misleading at best.

Given that the Teaching American History (TAH) program at ED may about to be cut, the issue of evidence for TAH success is particularly timely.  As we’ve pointed out in the past, while there may be a number of reasons to expand, reshape, or eliminate TAH, the claim that there is no evidence that TAH works is simply false.  Each grant includes an evaluation plan.  Evaluation is a required part of every TAH grant, and we’ve written and implemented a lot of them.  Under the program requirements set by the Government Performance and Reporting Act (GPRA), each Teaching American History grant must report:

The average percentage change in the scores (on a pre-post assessment of American history) of participants who complete at least 75 percent of the professional development hours offered by the project. The test or measure will be aligned with the TAH project and at least 50 percent of its questions will come from a validated test of American history.

Besides such serious testing on honest-to-goodness U.S. history content knowledge, we often conduct focus groups, pre-post lesson plan and student assignment and work analysis as well as surveys about changes in classroom practices that we administer to students and teachers alike.

You might have a problem with these requirements and practices.  You might have a problem with the aggregated results.  But it is false to say there is no evidence that TAH grants work.  Teachers are routinely tested in American history content before and after they participate in their grant’s events, often by independent evaluation firms such as ours, and we often see scores rise on multiple annual pre-post tests.  In how many other ED funded programs are the program participants administered pre-post content knowledge tests?  At a time when American history is often not an educational priority, teachers themselves routinely report to us how much they’ve learned and how much they love this program because it focuses on content over methodology.  Obviously, some programs tend to be much better than others.  There is a lot to learn from here.

A more reasonable charge that has been leveled concerning the evaluation of the TAH program is that there is scant evidence that teaching U.S. history teachers traditional American history increases student knowledge of American history. Sam Wineburg made such arguments, among other more pertinent observations, in a speech at the 2009 OAH conference (and many others responded like this).  These complaints ultimately fall short.

It would be great if we lived in a world where we only funded programs that have been proven beyond a shadow of a doubt to increase student test scores.  Obviously, this is a matter of some debate.  It would be odd if the Teaching American History program was held to a standard that the rest of ED doesn’t have to meet.  Unfortunately, the fact is that the relationship between professional development programs for K-12 teachers and student achievement is a difficult measurement problem that is expensive to solve.  People of good will have argued over how to prove that various programs for teachers improve student test scores for years and will continue to do so in the future.  According to a 2007 Institute of Education Sciences/Department of Education study, only nine studies out of over 1300 were able to pass rigorous What Works Clearinghouse standards in order to measure the relationship between professional development programs and student achievement.

Does this lack of statistical evidence mean that all teacher professional development is a waste of time?  Should we institute a nationwide moratorium on all funding of professional development programs for teachers?

Senator Robert Byrd, Senator Edward Kennedy and Senator Lamar Alexander all supported the Teaching American History program based on a common sense assumption: teachers can’t teach what they don’t know. A knowledge of traditional American history is a necessary but not sufficient condition for student achievement. The program is supposed to teach:

…the significant issues, episodes, and turning points in the history of the United States; how the words and deeds of individual Americans have determined the course of our Nation; and how the principles of freedom and democracy articulated in the founding documents of this Nation have shaped America’s struggles and achievements and its social, political, and legal institutions and relations.

If a teacher is ignorant of these things, we can be sure they won’t be able to teach what they don’t know.  Possessing such knowledge does not mean that they can teach well, but without it they can’t teach at all.

It may be that Congress deems there is good reason to cut the Teaching American History grant program.  The claim that there is no evidence the program works should not be one of these reasons.  We believe that changes could certainly be made to the program to ensure much needed research and evaluation of historical learning takes place in such a way as to impact the teaching of American history nationwide for the better.  We could offer advice as to the best practices we’ve seen that enable some TAH programs to fulfill the program’s goals better than others and how the program might be restructured in order to better achieve those goals.

Political reality being what it is, however, it seems that TAH might disappear without anyone fully considering these issues.  Given that both political parties recognize the need for history teachers to know American history better than they do at present, it would be worthwhile for everyone concerned if instead of simply nixing the program we had an adult discussion of what sort of structural changes at the state and federal level could help better achieve its goals.  What evidence do we have that this program is not working and what evidence do we have that it is working?  What works and what doesn’t? Given the importance of history education to our goals as a nation, shouldn’t we talk about these issues and learn needed lessons from our experience with one of the most unique programs in the history of American history and civic education before we get rid of it?

Here’s a portion of George Washington’s First Annual Message to Congress:

Knowledge is in every country the surest basis of public happiness. In one in which the measures of Government receive their impression so immediately from the sense of the Community as in ours it is proportionably essential. To the security of a free Constitution it contributes in various ways: By convincing those who are intrusted with the public administration, that every valuable end of Government is best answered by the enlightened confidence of the people: and by teaching the people themselves to know and to value their own rights; to discern and provide against invasions of them; to distinguish between oppression and the necessary exercise of lawful authority; between burthens proceeding from a disregard to their convenience and those resulting from the inevitable exigencies of Society; to discriminate the spirit of Liberty from that of licentiousness— cherishing the first, avoiding the last, and uniting a speedy, but temperate vigilance against encroachments, with an inviolable respect to the Laws.

Whether this desirable object will be the best promoted by affording aids to seminaries of learning already established, by the institution of a national University, or by any other expedients, will be well worthy of a place in the deliberations of the Legislature.

The Teaching American History program is one of the few attempts at “other expedients” to fulfill Washington’s mandate ever undertaken at the federal level. We ought to be looking to learn from our experience with the Teaching American History program.
Teaching American History Evaluation Grant Tips: FOIA Reading Room
Mia D. Howerton of the Department of Education’s Teaching American History (TAH) grant program recently reminded the H-TAH H-NET discussion group about the Office of Innovation and Improvement’s FOIA Reading Room.

As you write your TAH grant, you might want to see examples of previously funded grants, and the FOIA Reading Room provides you with a total of 13 accepted grant applications from 2008, 2009, 2010.  In 2009, for instance, we provided evaluation services for two of the three examples posted (CHARMS and Northshore).  Although the core of any good Teaching American History grant proposal is a plan that addresses the proven, unique needs of your district(s) in way that integrates evaluation into the structure of the program, it helps to have a menu of options to choose from.  The FOIA Reading Room provides this for you.

The 2011 Teaching American History (TAH) program RFP has been released, and completed grant applications are due to the Department of Education on April 4th, 2011.  Evaluation is an even more significant part of the grant application than it has been in the past. As a special service for Teaching American History grant clients, we will consult with you and even assist in designing and writing the evaluation portion of your Teaching American History grant application free of charge. We will also help you design and implement a needs assessment for your teachers and students free of charge. The clock is ticking: call us today at (570) 744-1618 or email evaluation@grantevaluation.com
Teaching American History (TAH) Evaluation 2011 RFP & Grant Application Tips
As evaluators for over 50 Teaching American History (TAH) grants over the last decade, we’ve learned a lot.  The most successful TAH grants, in our experience, put time and effort into an evaluation plan well before the grant begins.  Evaluation planning sessions provide an ordered way for you to think through how best to structure your grant.  Whether or not you ask your evaluator to assist you with a needs assessment, you should be able to clearly articulate why your district needs a Teaching American history grant and how your particular grant proposal will directly address those needs.

When you consider how best to measure the success of your grant with an evaluation plan, you will be forced to think through the relationship between your overall goals and the various pieces and structure of your grant proposal. This is a healthy exercise that can only strengthen your grant writing and content.

As you think through how best to structure your grant and work with your partners to plan the content of your professional development program, remember that evaluation is a required part of the grant.  It shouldn’t be an afterthought.  The best evaluation plans are integrated into the program itself throughout the life of the grant.  This way, not only will you be able to provide the results of the performance measures the Department of Education requires every year, but you will also be able to work in benchmarks that can assist you in managing the grant.

Remember too that any evaluation component you add into the grant application will become a promise to the Department of Education should your grant application be accepted.  The evaluation should be realistic, yet rigorous.

Read more about how we can help you by clicking here.

As a special service to Teaching American History grant clients, we will assist in designing and writing the evaluation portion of your Teaching American History grant application free of charge. We will consult with you and design and administer a needs assessment instrument as well as a plan to directly address the competitive preference priorities. The clock is ticking: call us today to get started! Call (570) 744-1618 or email evaluation@grantevaluation.com
Teaching American History Evaluation: Enabling More Data-Based Decision-Making & the 2011 RFP
The 2011 Teaching American History (TAH) program RFP makes evaluation an even more significant part of the grant application than it has been in the past.

Read it here.

The quality of the evaluation counts for 25 points of the total score of your proposal. Just like last year, your grant proposal will first be scored on overall project quality (35 points), quality of the project design (35 points), need for the project (20 points) and the quality of the management plan (10 points). If you score high high enough in these areas, your application will then be scored by another set of reviewers on the evaluation plan. The quality of the project evaluation plan (25 points) can thus make or break your Teaching American History proposal.

Read more about how we can help you by clicking here.

As we discussed in an earlier post, the needs assessment is also something your evaluator can assist you with. Further, the third competitive preference priority awards up to three additional points for:
Projects that are designed to collect (or obtain), analyze, and use high quality and timely data, including data on program participant outcomes, in accordance with privacy requirements (as defined in this notice), in one or both of the following priority areas:

(a) Improving instructional practices, policies, and student outcomes in elementary and secondary schools.

(b) Providing reliable and comprehensive information on the implementation of Department of Education programs, and participant outcomes in these programs by using data from State longitudinal data systems or by obtaining data from reliable third-party sources.
Your evaluator ought to assist you in planning how you will collect, analyze, and use data in order to meet this priority in a way that makes sense for you.

As a special service to Teaching American History grant clients, we will assist in designing and writing the evaluation portion of your Teaching American History grant application free of charge. We will consult with you and design and administer a needs assessment instrument as well as a plan to directly address the competitive preference priorities. The clock is ticking: call us today to get started! Call (570) 744-1618 or email evaluation@grantevaluation.com
Teaching American History Evaluation: Need Assessments & the 2011 RFP
The evaluation for a successful Teaching American History grant starts well before you are finished writing your TAH grant proposal.

Up to 20 points of the total score of your grant proposal will depend on how well you demonstrate the need for the project. How will you accomplish this?

The 2011 TAH RFP says:
Note: The Secretary encourages applicants to provide information on the district’s American history program, including on the number of teachers, the teachers’ qualifications and certifications, the American history professional development currently being offered in the district, and student performance in American history class. The applicant is also encouraged to address how its proposed professional development strategy will significantly improve both teachers’ ability to teach traditional American history content and student performance with regard to traditional American history. Applicants’ responses to the Need for project criterion should address the American history content needs of the teachers, not the socioeconomic needs of the teachers or the students they serve.
In other words, you need to show how a real deficiency in the American history content needs of your teachers and students will be addressed by your grant. As evaluators on over 50 TAH grants over the last decade, we have developed several needs assessment instruments that can be adapted to help you examine the US history content knowledge and classroom practices of your teachers and students. These can be administered either online or via paper; we’ll collect, tally and explain the results. Discovering where your needs are is not only important for your TAH grant application in answer to the RFP. A needs assessment ought to help you design the structure of your grant and write your grant narrative, as it will reveal what your TAH grant ought to be focused on addressing.

As a special service to Teaching American History grant clients, we will consult with you and design and administer a needs assessment free of charge. In consultation with you, we will also assist in designing and writing the evaluation portion of your Teaching American History grant application free of charge. The clock is ticking: call us today to get started! Call (570) 744-1618 or email evaluation@grantevaluation.com

Click here and visit our TAH grant page for more.

A needs assessment will also be important this year in order to obtain up to 3 extra points by meet the second competitive priority preference to improve achievement and high school graduation rates, which the Teaching American History RFP defines as: (more…)
Teaching American History RFP 2011 – TAH Evaluation Is Key
The long awaited Teaching American History (TAH) program RFP has been published today, and evaluation is an even more significant part of the grant application than it has been in the past.  Read it here.

The quality of the evaluation counts for 25 points of the total score of your proposal.  Just like last year, your grant proposal will first be scored on overall project quality (35 points), quality of the project design (35 points), need for the project (20 points) and the quality of the management plan (10 points).  If you score high high enough in these areas, your application will then be scored by another set of reviewers on the evaluation plan.  The quality of the project evaluation plan (25 points) can thus make or break your Teaching American History proposal.

Further, consider two of the four new competitive preference priorities.  Priority 2 gives up to three additional points for improving achievement and high school graduation rates” and priority 3 gives up to three additional points for “enabling more data-based decision-making.”  Addressing both these priorities will require a rigorously designed and well implemented evaluation plan.

We will be breaking down the RFP in future posts with tips and commentary in the coming days, so check back soon.  Also, save the date: the ED TAH staff will hold two pre-application meetings on March 11 in Washington, D.C. at the Department of Education.

As always, never hesitate to contact us concerning your evaluation needs. Call us at (570) 744-1618 or email evaluation@grantevaluation.com

As a special service to Teaching American History grant clients, we will consult with you and even assist in designing and writing the evaluation portion of your Teaching American History grant application free of charge.  The clock is ticking: call us today to get started!