Grant Evaluations, Inc. has extensive experience measuring the impact and effectiveness of Teaching American History (TAH) grant programs. Our research designs have helped produce over 50 successful Teaching American History grant awards. We continually refine and tailor our menu of designs and instruments to meet federal requirements and your unique needs.

We have conducted program and process evaluations of American History learning curricula and projects across the nation, surveying and analyzing data on thousands of teachers and students. Besides serving as evaluator on over 50 Teaching American History grants over the years, we have evaluated the ED funded national Presidential and Congressional Academies for American History and Civics; Bill of Rights Institute curricula projects; statewide high school senior civics surveys; and, Italian American Heritage projects.

CEO Bob Peterson presented on “Evaluation: A National Perspective” and “Measuring Teacher and Student Knowledge Gains” at the 2009 and 2006 Teaching American History Project Directors Conference sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education.

TEACHING AMERICAN HISTORY EVALUATION

Evaluation Design and Services


The 2011 Teaching American History (TAH) program RFP has been released, and completed grant applications are due to the Department of Education on April 4th, 2011.  Evaluation is an even more significant part of the grant application than it has been in the past.


As a special service for Teaching American History grant clients, we will consult with you and even assist in designing and writing the evaluation portion of your Teaching American History grant application free of charge. We will also help you design and implement a needs assessment for your teachers and students free of charge.


The clock is ticking: call us today at (607) 239-1000 or email evaluation@grantevaluation.com


The GEI Design Advantage:

Needs Assessment: We’ve learned that the evaluation for a successful Teaching American History grant starts well before you are finished writing your TAH grant proposal. Over the last decade we’ve developed several needs assessment instruments that can be adapted to help you examine the US history content knowledge and classroom practices of your teachers and students. These can be administered either online or via paper; we’ll collect, tally and explain the results.


Discovering where your needs are is not only important in order to receive up to 20 points on the Need for project section of your TAH grant application in answer to the RFP. A needs assessment ought to help you design the structure of your grant and write your grant narrative, as it will reveal and clarify the goals of your TAH grant.

Personal Service: GEI directly participates in your professional development sessions and works with grant instructors, teachers, and administrators to ensure that the final evaluation design, instruments, and implementation are custom fit to individual projects.  This hands on approach ensures that evaluation instruments are aligned with actual practices as they take place.


National Database: GEI has a growing database that can provide broader comparison of data with other states and regions. GEI also has collected results from numerous national surveys on American history knowledge levels. This analysis is in addition to the comparison groups already included in the local project.


Proven Measurement Tools: GEI has tested survey measures targeted to accurately ascertain teacher and student knowledge gain, changes in classroom and student learning practices, and changes in history understanding, interest levels, opinion, and attitudes. The database includes hundreds of diverse measurement tools.


Multi-faceted Approach: GEI examines project impact through multiple lenses and takes a comprehensive view of results generated.  Each professional development session is evaluated individually, allowing comparison with other sessions and with the overall annual impact on teacher knowledge and practices.  Teacher and student perspectives are aligned and compared.  Resource utilization and project products are also reviewed and contrasted.


Technical Expertise:  The GEI team includes history educators and experts in educational assessment, statistics, research design, classroom teaching, and a national evaluation research leader.  Surveys are developed and read on professional Scantron equipment and sophisticated analytical techniques are applied as appropriate.  The analysis allows for before and after comparison, comparison with teachers not in the project, and comparisons over time of the project teachers.


Useful and User-Friendly Reports:  GEI provides ongoing evaluation reports in a graphic and user friendly format.  Project administrators and teams can adapt their program based upon evaluation results.


Meeting Federal Evaluation Requirements: GEI helps prepare federal annual and final project evaluation reports to ensure that reporting requirements are met annually.  We provide and explain the evaluation data you need to complete your annual performance report.


The experience of Grant Evaluations, Inc. with American History learning, curricula and professional development projects, and the extensive evaluation resources that GEI has available result in a more efficient and effective evaluation for your project.  GEI provides more diverse professional evaluation services due to this economy of scale and prior experience.

Experience: We have conducted impact and process evaluations of American History learning curricula and projects across the nation, surveying and analyzing data on thousands of teachers and students. Besides serving as evaluator on over 50 Teaching American History grants over the years, we have evaluated the ED funded national Presidential and Congressional Academies for American History and Civics; Bill of Rights Institute curricula projects; statewide high school senior civics surveys; and, Italian American Heritage projects. CEO Bob Peterson presented on “Evaluation: A National Perspective” and “Measuring Teacher and Student Knowledge Gains” at the 2009 and 2006 Teaching American History Project Directors Conference sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education.